The Vermont Cynic

Looking up to three women

Tracy DeLade, Cynic Correspondent

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






They dash between academic buildings, give lectures at other colleges and work hard in downtown businesses. Here in Burlington, there are countless women to look out for.

Women like Kathryn Fox remind us that the world is full of ambitious and determined women.

In her 23-year career at UVM, Fox has gone from just a sociology professor to an administrator for the College of Arts and Sciences.

This winter, she will be teaching sociology to prisoners in Swanton, Vermont.

“I have had an interest in criminal justice for 20 years and I’ve been in so many [prisons], I’m not really afraid,” she said.

Fox hopes her efforts to provide education for prisoners will be well established when it is time for her retirement, Fox said.  

“Teaching liberal arts in prisons really changes people’s lives,” she said.

The Liberal Arts in Prison Program will be taught by roughly 15 other UVM faculty from the College of Arts and Sciences, according to the LAPP website.

“Vermont citizens inside correctional facilities have the same potential for achievement… and they are entitled to opportunities to improve their lives,” the UVM LAPP webpage states.

Before Fox changed positions at UVM, “she made 8:30 [classes] bearable with her enthusiasm,” sophomore Jackie LeSeur said.

LeSeur was a student in Fox’s Sociology 001 course last spring. “I’m really upset she won’t teach again, but [the prisoners] will be very lucky to have the best teacher,” she said. “She really wanted her students to do well.”

Kathryn Fox reminds us that the world is full of ambitious and determined women.

In her 23-year career at UVM, Fox has gone from just a sociology professor to an administrator for the College of Arts and Sciences.

This winter, she will be teaching sociology to prisoners in Swanton, Vermont.

“I have had an interest in criminal justice for 20 years and I’ve been in so many [prisons], I’m not really afraid,” she said.

Fox hopes her efforts to continually provide education for prisoners will be well established when it is time for her retirement, Fox said.

The Liberal Arts in Prison Program will be taught by roughly 15 other UVM faculty from the College of Arts and Sciences, according to the LAPP website.

“Vermont citizens inside correctional facilities have the same potential for achievement and they are entitled to opportunities to improve their lives,” the UVM LAPP webpage states.

“I’m really upset she won’t teach again, but [the prisoners] will be very lucky to have the best teacher,” she said. “She really wanted her students to do well.”

With so many incredible professors and professionals to look up to, students’ work can often be overlooked, but there are some amazing young  women who should not be ignored.

Ella Guinan is another example of a strong Burlington woman who is chasing her dreams of helping others through her education at UVM.

A sophomore from Manchester, Connecticut, Guinan is majoring in psychology and sociology,  with minors in writing and French.

She recently participated in a rally against racial injustices on Sept. 25 as a part of her involvement in the Black Student Union, she said.

Guinan is also a member of a new club at UVM for women skiers and snowboarders called “Chicks on Sticks.”

“Ella’s ability to make women feel strong is one of her most admirable qualities,” sophomore Sophia Clune said.

The direction of Guinan’s career became clear to her when she discovered her dream to be a journalist for women’s issues or an investigative journalist for VICE, she said.

She realized that through a career in news writing she could “bring awareness to people and make more change in the world,” she said.

“When I was younger, I always knew I wanted to make change,” she said.

Double-majoring and having two minors is proof of Guinan’s effort to achieve her dream career, and also provides her opportunities to help others, she said.

In fact, Guinan is currently selling $6 bracelets made by impoverished women in Nicaragua, with all profits going back to the women, she said.

“[Guinan is] very insightful, sweet and I can count on her for advice anytime because she’s very true to her morals,” Clune said.

Ella Guinan is yet another example of a strong Burlington woman who is chasing her dreams of helping others through her education here at UVM.

A sophomore from Manchester, Connecticut, Guinan is majoring in psychology and sociology,  with minors in writing and French.

She recently participated in a rally against racial injustices on Sept. 25 as a part of her involvement in the Black Student Union, she said.

Guinan is also a member of a new club at UVM for women skiers and snowboarders called “Chicks on Sticks.”

“Ella’s ability to make women feel strong is one of her most admirable qualities,” sophomore Sophia Clune said.

Double-majoring and having two minors is proof of Guinan’s efforts to achieve her dream career of being a journalist for women’s issues, she said.

Nestled in downtown Burlington, away from the academia of campus is a small art studio run by a hard-working woman.

Katharine Monstream is a local artist who said she began her career by accident.

“I didn’t really have a dream of being an artist and never expected my career to turn out this way,” she said.  

Instead of starting her career path with the arts, Monstream graduated from the University of Colorado Boulder, taking a waitressing job once out of school until she switched to real estate, she said.

When Monstream sold about 15,000 handmade greeting cards in two years, her underground art business exploded, she said.

So began her accidental career as an artist at age 26. Monstream never regretted that she didn’t study art in school because everything has “its own momentum,” she said.

Repeating hundreds of the same paintings on hundreds of greeting cards was “like practicing a violin to become better,” Monstream said.

The greeting cards were decorated with painted iconic images of Vermont, such as Lake Champlain at dusk, wildflowers and cows in a grassy field.

“After a while I got really burnt out and I started printing the cards,” she said. Monstream now dedicates more of her time to painting bigger works.

She is currently concentrating on images of swimming holes and will be having a show in May. “Every day is a day off,” she said.

 

Nestled in downtown Burlington away from the academia of campus is a small art studio run by a hard-working woman.

Katharine Monstream is a local artist who said she began her career organically.

“I didn’t really have a dream of being an artist and never expected my career to turn out this way,” she said.  

Instead of starting her career path with the arts, Monstream graduated from the University of Colorado Boulder, taking a waitressing job once out of school until she switched to real estate, she said.

When Monstream sold about 15,000 handmade greeting cards in two years, her underground art business exploded, she said.

  So began her accidental career as an artist at age 26. Monstream was never regretful that she didn’t study art in school because everything has “its own momentum,” she said.

“After a while I got really burnt out and I started printing the cards,” she said. Monstream now dedicates more of her time to painting bigger works.

She is currently concentrating on images of swimming holes and will be having a show in May.

“Every day is a day off,” she said.

Leave a Comment

If you want a picture to show with your comment, go get a gravatar.




Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






The University of Vermont's Independent Voice Since 1883
Looking up to three women