Tackling a major decision

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Junior David Brandt said he always intended on declaring a political science major, but wanted to wait until he had taken some classes at UVM.

“By the end of my second semester, I realized that all of my favorite classes were my [political science] classes,” he said. For students unsure where their passions lie students can enroll as “undeclared.”

“I started at UVM as undeclared, and now I am a political science major with minors in Spanish and geography,” Brandt said.

Junior Teresa Dotson said she also began at UVM undeclared. “It was kind of unnerving that first semester, being so uncertain,” she said. “But after taking an anthropology course my second semester, I realized that’s where my passion is.” Dotson is now an anthropolgy major.

“In all of UVM’s undergraduate programs, the curriculum is designed to encourage students to explore a variety of disciplines during their first two years,” according the University website.

There are resources that may be helpful to students. The University encourages students to take advantage of Career Services, where counselors are available to discuss their academic interests, majors and careers.

Brandt said he met with his adviser as well as the student services office and instructor office hours.

Junior Kara Shamsi is a business major minoring in global studies. Shamsi suggests first-years join a club that will help them “assess their academic goals.”

“I worked at a bank my senior year [of high school], which helped me realize I was interested in business,” Shamsi said.

Business administration and management is one of the most popular majors at UVM, according to U.S. News. Other popular majors are psychology, english language and literature, environmental studies, and political science and government.

Sophomore Julia Weilandt, came to UVM as an environmental studies major. “I’m from Chicago, and a lot of cities are heavily polluted,” Weilandt said.

“Rooftop gardening is something I’m learning about from my major, and it could be a solution to this problem,” she said.