The Vermont Cynic

Athletes’ pre-game rituals

Do superstitions and pre-game rituals really give athletes a competitive edge over their opponents?  Many UVM student athletes would argue yes.  Different athletes have numerous superstitions and rituals that they will practice to givDo superstitions and pre-game rituals really give athletes a competitive edge over their opponents?  Many UVM student athletes would argue yes.  Different athletes have numerous superstitions and rituals that they will practice to give themselves what they believe is that little bit of extra edge that may or may not help them come game time.  Senior Nick Bruneteau is a defensemen for men’s varsity hockey team and has a few pregame rituals that he performs leading up to game day. “I eat the same thing every pregame meal at 1 p.m., spit on my stick twice before every game and wear the same suit-shirt-tie combo on a winning streak,” he said.  When asked if he was superstitious Bruneteau said, “Yes, if something works I won’t change it and I try to replicate it the exact same way as the previous game when we won.” Junior forward Ashley McDonald was captain of the women’s varsity field hockey team this past season. “One thing I do before every game is look for my parents in the stands,” McDonald said. “If I look in the stands and I can’t find them, I start to get a bit anxious and it can throw my game off a bit,” she said. Junior Jack Leclerc, the club football quarterback, said that he is also superstitious.  “If I play a great game and I’m wearing a certain pair of socks, then I’ll definitely be wearing those same socks in the next game,” Leclerc said. Sophomore Steven Ushakov is a member of the club hockey team.  “My pre-game rituals go back to when I started playing varsity high school hockey,” Ushakov said. “I felt the need to develop rituals that I could rely on to keep my mental focus and level of play consistent once I hit the ice.” First-year Ian McKay, midfielder on the men’s varsity lacrosse team said he has his own rituals before every match. “No one can touch my stick on game days. I also am the last one to leave the locker room and the last one to stand in line during the national anthem,” he said. Superstitions and pregame rituals span from high school athletes all the way up to the pros.  Whether these rituals are actually helping their games is up for discussion but it doesn’t stop the athletes from trying. No matter how big or small the game, these student athletes will always be doing their routines on game day to try and get the upper hand. e themselves what they believe is that little bit of extra edge that may or may not help them come game time.  Senior Nick Bruneteau is a defensemen for men’s varsity hockey team and has a few pregame rituals that he performs leading up to game day. “I eat the same thing every pregame meal at 1 p.m., spit on my stick twice before every game and wear the same suit-shirt-tie combo on a winning streak,” he said.  When asked if he was superstitious Bruneteau said, “Yes, if something works I won’t change it and I try to replicate it the exact same way as the previous game when we won.” Junior forward Ashley McDonald was captain of the women’s varsity field hockey team this past season. “One thing I do before every game is look for my parents in the stands,” McDonald said. “If I look in the stands and I can’t find them, I start to get a bit anxious and it can throw my game off a bit,” she said. Junior Jack Leclerc, the club football quarterback, said that he is also superstitious.  “If I play a great game and I’m wearing a certain pair of socks, then I’ll definitely be wearing those same socks in the next game,” Leclerc said. Sophomore Steven Ushakov is a member of the club hockey team.  “My pre-game rituals go back to when I started playing varsity high school hockey,” Ushakov said. “I felt the need to develop rituals that I could rely on to keep my mental focus and level of play consistent once I hit the ice.” First-year Ian McKay, midfielder on the men’s varsity lacrosse team said he has his own rituals before every match. “No one can touch my stick on game days. I also am the last one to leave the locker room and the last one to stand in line during the national anthem,” he said. Superstitions and pregame rituals span from high school athletes all the way up to the pros.  Whether these rituals are actually helping their games is up for discussion but it doesn’t stop the athletes from trying. No matter how big or small the game, these student athletes will always be doing their routines on game day to try and get the upper hand. 

Athletes’ pre-game rituals

Do superstitions and pre-game rituals really give athletes a competitive edge over their opponents?

Many UVM student athletes would argue yes.

Different athletes have numerous superstitions and rituals that they will practice to givDo superstitions and pre-game rituals really give athletes a competitive edge over their opponents?

Many UVM student athletes would argue yes.

Different athletes have numerous superstitions and rituals that they will practice to give themselves what they believe is that little bit of extra edge that may or may not help them come game time.

Senior Nick Bruneteau is a defensemen for men’s varsity hockey team and has a few pregame rituals that he performs leading up to game day.

“I eat the same thing every pregame meal at 1 p.m., spit on my stick twice before every game and wear the same suit-shirt-tie combo on a winning streak,” he said.

When asked if he was superstitious Bruneteau said, “Yes, if something works I won’t change it and I try to replicate it the exact same way as the previous game when we won.”

Junior forward Ashley McDonald was captain of the women’s varsity field hockey team this past season.

“One thing I do before every game is look for my parents in the stands,” McDonald said.

“If I look in the stands and I can’t find them, I start to get a bit anxious and it can throw my game off a bit,” she said.

Junior Jack Leclerc, the club football quarterback, said that he is also superstitious.

“If I play a great game and I’m wearing a certain pair of socks, then I’ll definitely be wearing those same socks in the next game,” Leclerc said.

Sophomore Steven Ushakov is a member of the club hockey team.

“My pre-game rituals go back to when I started playing varsity high school hockey,” Ushakov said. “I felt the need to develop rituals that I could rely on to keep my mental focus and level of play consistent once I hit the ice.”

First-year Ian McKay, midfielder on the men’s varsity lacrosse team said he has his own rituals before every match.

“No one can touch my stick on game days. I also am the last one to leave the locker room and the last one to stand in line during the national anthem,” he said.

Superstitions and pregame rituals span from high school athletes all the way up to the pros.

Whether these rituals are actually helping their games is up for discussion but it doesn’t stop the athletes from trying.

No matter how big or small the game, these student athletes will always be doing their routines on game day to try and get the upper hand. e themselves what they believe is that little bit of extra edge that may or may not help them come game time.

Senior Nick Bruneteau is a defensemen for men’s varsity hockey team and has a few pregame rituals that he performs leading up to game day.

“I eat the same thing every pregame meal at 1 p.m., spit on my stick twice before every game and wear the same suit-shirt-tie combo on a winning streak,” he said.

When asked if he was superstitious Bruneteau said, “Yes, if something works I won’t change it and I try to replicate it the exact same way as the previous game when we won.”

Junior forward Ashley McDonald was captain of the women’s varsity field hockey team this past season.

“One thing I do before every game is look for my parents in the stands,” McDonald said.

“If I look in the stands and I can’t find them, I start to get a bit anxious and it can throw my game off a bit,” she said.

Junior Jack Leclerc, the club football quarterback, said that he is also superstitious.

“If I play a great game and I’m wearing a certain pair of socks, then I’ll definitely be wearing those same socks in the next game,” Leclerc said.

Sophomore Steven Ushakov is a member of the club hockey team.

“My pre-game rituals go back to when I started playing varsity high school hockey,” Ushakov said. “I felt the need to develop rituals that I could rely on to keep my mental focus and level of play consistent once I hit the ice.”

First-year Ian McKay, midfielder on the men’s varsity lacrosse team said he has his own rituals before every match.12

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Athletes’ pre-game rituals