The Vermont Cynic

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VT Democratic Party celebrates the newly elected

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Tears of happiness, sorrow and uncertainty were shed at the Vermont Democratic Party election reception.

Vermont Democrats congregated in the Adirondack Ballroom in Burlington’s  Hilton Hotel to watch as election results trickled in the evening Nov. 8.

“We did it the ‘Vermont way,’” Vermont Attorney General TJ Donovan said. “This is an exciting time to be a Vermonter.”

The audience responded with enthusiastic cheers and applause.

Donovan was among the victorious Democrats at the event.  

Each candidate said the community must remain focused and stay together, regardless of the outcome of the elections.

As the night unfolded, tension among voters rose.

“Trump is a threat to women [and] minorities,” junior Erin Hall said. ‘A vote for Trump is a threat to all of my civil liberties.”

The reality of this, however, and the corresponding effects that would follow if Trump were elected are largely due to the lack of voter participation on the Democratic side, Franklin County resident Sylvia Williams said.

Due to their love for Sen. Bernie Sanders, many people chose not to participate in the election, Williams said. Though she described herself as a once avid Sanders supporter, Williams said she still supported Clinton — even though she was not her first choice—knowing everything that is “at stake.”

Among the college students and adults at the event, 13-year-old Adam Frantz was also there, and said he was lukewarm about supporting Clinton.

“She’s not Trump,” Frantz said, explaining why he supports the democratic candidate.

If Trump were to be elected,  “bad things” will follow, but that no one can be entirely sure of what will follow, until it actually happens, he said.

As polls closed and results came in, winners and losers of the Democratic Party stood to accept the decision of the people.

Patrick Leahy

Sen. Patrick Leahy cruised to an easy victory in the senatorial election, as many polls had predicted.

Leahy offered his perspective on the 2016 election, explaining that his frustrations exist predominantly over Donald Trump’s negative campaign rhetoric, which has given way to an “anti-people” sentiment within the minds of Americans.

“This sentiment falsely represents Americans’ frustrations,” Leahy said. ”It places them on groups of people and ideologies that shouldn’t be subjected to this targeting.”

Sue Minter

Shortly after Condos’ remarks about the electoral process, it was announced that Sue Minter would be taking the stage to deliver her concession speech — Republican Phil Scott won the governor’s race.

As Minter entered the room, she danced to “Say Hey (I Love You)” by Michael Franti & Spearhead, shaking hands and hugging people while making her way to the stage.

Minter’s positivity, despite the loss, caught on, and soon the audience joined her in singing and dancing.

By the time she reached  the stage, Minter  and her family — as well as everyone in the crowd — continued to sing and dance up until the song concluded.

Once the song finished, Minter began her address.

“It has been a long night,” she said, “[but] an amazing journey.”

Minter thanked both her family and her opponent, congratulating him on his victory.

“Here in Vermont,” she said, “we can still disagree, without being disagreeable.”

“[Scott] will do his best to serve as our governor and lead our state,” she said.

Minter went on to encourage all Vermonters to continue to do what they’ve been doing: advocate for change.

“You are what makes our democracy strong,” she said to the crowd.

“We have left it out on the floor, and there are no regrets,” Minter said. “[But] nothing ends tonight — every end is a new beginning.”

After this, she stepped away from the mic, only to be met with “Thank you, Sue!” chants from the audience.

TJ Donovan

TJ Donovan, the Democratic candidate for attorney general, was the first candidate to recieve definitive results.

Donovan took the stage to congratulate his opponent on a hard fought campaign and thank his family for the incredible experience with which this election provided him.

In his acceptance speech, Donovan reinforced his goals as Vermont’s attorney general, in addition to encouraging what Vermonters ought to do regarding the presidential election.

“Let us demonstrate our courage,” he said, “by showing compassion to all Vermonters.”

At the end of his speech, Donovan reiterated his thanks to his family, friends, and citizens of Vermont. The crowd cheered as he exited the stage.

Beth Pearce

Beth Pearce was re-elected as state treasurer.

Pearce pledged to effectively manage the state pension funds for the thousands of state employees who depend on it. Pearce said she believes all employees should have “dignity in retirement,” she said.

To do this, Pearce said she plans to focus on local investments, which would reduce student debt, in addition to effectively managing the state’s budget, she said. She also said she will focus on cleaning up Vermont’s lakes and rivers.

David Zuckerman

David Zuckerman, the newly elected lieutenant governor, was the last candidate to take the stage.

Though disappointed with Minter’s defeat, David Zuckerman said he is optimistic for the future, and all that Vermont will accomplish over the next few years.

“I have a lot of respect for [Scott],” Zuckerman said,”he wants to work with people, as do I.”

“We’ll push through [challenges] to work toward a progressive agenda,” he added.

Many attendees left after Zuckerman’s remarks, prior to the announcement of Donald J. Trump’s victory at around 2:30 a.m.

As the night unfolded, and votes began to slow down, tension among anxious voters rose.

Amidst this, people began to contemplate what implications may follow if Donald Trump is elected.

“Trump is a threat to women [and] minorities,” junior Erin Hall said.”A vote for Trump is a threat to all of my civil liberties.”

what implications would follow if he clenched the presidency.

“Just disappointment,” junior Kateja Ostojic said.

The reality of this, however, and the corresponding effects that would follow if Trump were elected are largely due to the lack of voter participation on the Democratic side, Franklin County resident Sylvia Williams said.

Due to their love for Sen. Bernie Sanders, many people chose not to participate in the election, Williams said. Though she described herself as a once avid Sanders supporter, Williams said she  still supported Clinton—even though she was not her first choice—knowing everything that is “at stake.”

Among the college students and adults at the event, 13-year-old Adam Frantz was also there, and said he had lukewarm support for Clinton.

“She’s not Trump,” Frantz said, explaining why he supports the democratic candidate.

If Trump were to be elected, he said “bad things” will follow, also adding that no one can be entirely sure of what will follow, until it actually happens.

Later on, after the pause, it was announced that incumbent Jim Condos was elected into the position of Vermont’s secretary of state. Condos was first elected into this position in 2010.

“[As secretary of state],” he said, “I am responsible for the longstanding protection of Vermonters.”

“I will continue to stand up for the rights and freedoms for all Vermonters,” Condos said, which was met with a loud round of applause and cheers.

“Democracy should not be a partisan issue,” he said, concluding that as Vermonters, “we must embrace it.”

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VT Democratic Party celebrates the newly elected