The Vermont Cynic

At UVM, not all sports are recruited equal

Julian Golfarini

The University of Vermont may not be known around the country for its athletics. However, within the America East Conference, the school has won a few titles.

Men’s hockey, with a frozen four appearance in 2009 and men’s basketball, with two NCAA tournament appearances in the last four years, have shared in recent success.

Recruitment is key for the sustained success of the schools athletics, having said that, the school makes an effort to treat every athlete the same, Associate Athletic Director Joe Gervais said.

“Vermont athletes are great,” Gervais said. “We really try and look locally for our athletes when possible.”

However, some issues may arise with the availability of quality, local athletes.

The men’s soccer team can recruit in the state and remain competitive within our conference, men’s defender Yannick Lewis said.

So can the NCAA Champion Skiing, team which has nine Vermonters, according to the UVM athletics website.

The same cannot be said for the men’s hockey team.

“You could be the best high school hockey player in the state and still not be good enough for our program,” Athletic Director Robert Corran said. “Staying competitive is key.”

Talent is of key importance to the hockey team, which competes in one of the most competitive Hockey Conference in America, with Boston College recently winning the NCAA Hockey Championship on Monday, Corran said.

“Major junior hockey is also another challenge for us,” he said.

Major junior hockey allows for contact to be made earlier than in other sports like basketball or soccer where it is usually at the players junior year of high school, according to NCAA guidelines.

When athletes come to visit the University there are both official and unofficial styles of visit, Corran said.

The specifics of what’s allowed to happen in each are determined by sport. The main difference is that the athlete pays for the unofficial visit, and the school covers the official visit.

“The official visit was real cool, they showed me the school, my parents loved it, and this just seemed like a great place to go to school,” sophomore forward Luke Apfeld said.

Official visits may include a stay in the Sheraton Hotel, meals down on Church street, and visits with the current team, sophomore guard Sandro Carrissimo said.

“I remember coming to visit and going to Marcus Blakely’s 21st Birthday, it was a lot of fun,” Carrissimo said. “They really made me feel welcome here.”

For others, the draw was winning. As UVM is consistently one of the more competitive schools in the America East conference, having won titles in basketball and skiing, as well as making the frozen four in men’s hockey a few years ago.

“When I came to visit, the focus was on sports,” said sophomore right wing H.T. Lenz. “It was all about the facilities and coaching staff, as well as a bit of Burlington.”

The coaching staffs of the men’s hockey, basketball, and soccer teams were contacted for this interview and were not available for comment.

 

At UVM, not all sports are recruited equal

?             The University of Vermont may not be known around the country for its athletics. However, within the America East Conference, the school has won a few titles. Men’s hockey, with a frozen four appearance in 2009 and men’s basketball, with two NCAA tournament appearances in the last four years, have shared in recent success. Recruitment is key for the sustained success of the schools athletics, having said that, the school makes an effort to treat every athlete the same, Associate Athletic Director Joe Gervais said.             “Vermont athletes are great,” Gervais said. “We really try and look locally for our athletes when possible.” However, some issues may arise with the availability of quality, local athletes. The men’s soccer team can recruit in the state and remain competitive within our conference, men’s defender Yannick Lewis said. So can the NCAA Champion Skiing, team which has nine Vermonters, according to the UVM athletics website. The same cannot be said for the men’s hockey team.             “You could be the best high school hockey player in the state and still not be good enough for our program,” Athletic Director Robert Corran said. “Staying competitive is key.”             Talent is of key importance to the hockey team, which competes in one of the most competitive Hockey Conference in America, with Boston College recently winning the NCAA Hockey Championship on Monday, Corran said. “Major junior hockey is also another challenge for us,” he said.             Major junior hockey allows for contact to be made earlier than in other sports like basketball or soccer where it is usually at the players junior year of high school, according to NCAA guidelines.             When athletes come to visit the University there are both official and unofficial styles of visit, Corran said. The specifics of what’s allowed to happen in each are determined by sport. The main difference is that the athlete pays for the unofficial visit, and the school covers the official visit.             “The official visit was real cool, they showed me the school, my parents loved it, and this just seemed like a great place to go to school,” sophomore forward Luke Apfeld said.             Official visits may include a stay in the Sheraton hotel, meals down on Church street, and visits with the current team, sophomore guard Sandro Carrissimo said.             “I remember coming to visit and going to Marcus Blakely’s 21st Birthday, it was a lot of fun,” Carrissimo said. “They really made me feel welcome here.”             For others, the draw was winning. As UVM is consistently one of the more competitive schools in the America East conference, having won titles in basketball and skiing, as well as making the frozen four in men’s hockey a few years ago. “When I came to visit, the focus was on sports,” said sophomore right wing H.T. Lenz. “It was all about the facilities and coaching staff, as well as a bit of Burlington.” The coaching staffs of the men’s hockey, basketball, and soccer teams were contacted for this interview and were not available for comment.

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At UVM, not all sports are recruited equal