The Vermont Cynic

Rancing races to Burlington

Rance like no one is watching and rance to your own beat: that is the motto of Rancing Revolution, a social movement that uses rancing, a combination of running and dancing, to bring awareness to bullying.

The rancing movement was started at the College of William and Mary by Kailee Brickner-McDonald, director of the Dewey House for Civic Engagement, to spread her message about anti-bullying in an unconventional way.

The Rancing Revolution group hit Church Street Oct. 20 as anti-bullying supporters gathered in their neon green shirts to run and dance toward the waterfront while handing out fliers which posed the question, Why bully?

This was the first Rancing Revolution in Burlington and they hope to make it an annual event in October because it is anti-bullying month.

Corey Richardson, the executive director of the Rancing Revolution, kicked off the event with a speech about their mission.

Rancing is a great metaphor, but its also a form of activism, happy activism, Richardson said. If we make ourselves visible and rance hard enough, who knows? We might just create a cultural shift toward kindness.

The rancers got into position at the top of Church Street and blasted Jackson 5s song, ABC, as they ranced their way down the street.

Carin Hoffman, program specialist of the Dewey House for Civic Engagement, emphasized the importance of standing up against bullying.

Bullying is pervasive; it doesnt end in high school, Hoffman said. We are striking a pose against bullying so people are comfortable in their own identities.

Various people came out in support of the Rancing Revolution, including students and alumni.

I think it is a positive thing to do, said Anne Bouchard, an alumna of the class of 1979. You can get out and exercise.

Another supporter of the Rancing Revolution was pleased with the groups message.

I am completely against bullying and this seems like a unique way to discourage it, said Hannah Nasta, a high school student.

For more information on how to join the Rancing Revolution, visit www.rancingrevolution.com.

Rancing’ races to Burlington

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Rance like no one is watching and rance to your own beat: that is the motto of Rancing Revolution, a social movement that uses rancing, a combination of running and dancing, to bring awareness to bullying.

The rancing movement was started at the College of William and Mary by Kailee Brickner-McDonald, director of the Dewey House for Civic Engagement, to spread her message about anti-bullying in an unconventional way.

The Rancing Revolution group hit Church Street Oct. 20 as anti-bullying supporters gathered in their neon green shirts to run and dance toward the waterfront while handing out fliers which posed the question, “Why bully?”

This was the first Rancing Revolution in Burlington and they hope to make it an annual event in October because it is anti-bullying month.

Corey Richardson, the executive director of the Rancing Revolution, kicked off the event with a speech about their mission.

“Rancing is a great metaphor, but it’s also a form of activism, happy activism,” Richardson said. “If we make ourselves visible and rance hard enough, who knows? We might just create a cultural shift toward kindness.”

The rancers got into position at the top of Church Street and blasted Jackson 5’s song, “ABC,” as they ranced their way down the street.  

Carin Hoffman, program specialist of the Dewey House for Civic Engagement, emphasized the importance of standing up against bullying.

“Bullying is pervasive; it doesn’t end in high school,” Hoffman said. “We are striking a pose against bullying so people are comfortable in their own identities.”

Various people came out in support of the Rancing Revolution, including students and alumni.

“I think it is a positive thing to do,” said Anne Bouchard, an alumna of the class of 1979. “You can get out and exercise.”

Another supporter of the Rancing Revolution was pleased with the group’s message.

“I am completely against bullying and this seems like a unique way to discourage it,” said Hannah Nasta, a high school student. 

For more information on how to join the Rancing Revolution, visit www.rancingrevolution.com.

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Rancing races to Burlington