Faculty union rally locked out of executive offices

United+Academics+President+Sarah+Alexander%2C+associate+professor+of+English%2C++leads+a+group+of+protestors+across+South+Prospect+Street+into+the+Waterman+building+to+deliver+their+petition.

Alek Fleury

United Academics President Sarah Alexander, associate professor of English, leads a group of protestors across South Prospect Street into the Waterman building to deliver their petition.

Lee Hughes and Emma Pinezich

The faculty union and student activists were locked out of the executive offices as they tried to deliver their petition to the administration.

United Academics, the faculty union, hosted a 2:30 p.m. Feb. 26 rally on the Waterman Green attended by 40 faculty and students, including members from the Coalition for Student and Faculty Rights, NoNames for Justice and Queer Student Union.

The rally was to support the UA’s petition, which includes demands for the reinstatement of two lecturers whose contracts were recently not renewed, and students who received conduct hearing notices following participation in a Feb. 26 rally hosted by NoNames.

UA President Sarah Alexander, associate English professor, said she was surprised that the door was locked since normally people can walk into the Executive offices.

“It feels a little bit like they don’t care what we have to say enough to even allow someone in their office to accept our petition that had close to 1,000 signatures. We didn’t intend to disrupt anyone or make a ruckus,” Alexander said. “They clearly knew we were coming.”

Alexander gave the petition to Jim Vigoreaux, associate provost for faculty affairs, who was outside of the Executive Offices in Waterman.

Vigoreaux told her that he would give the petition to President Tom Sullivan, Alexander said.

Communications Director Enrique Corredera stated in an email that the University ensured that the petition would be delivered to a senior leadership team member. Vigoreaux received the petition and will be sharing the petition with other senior leaders, he stated.

 

This article was updated 9:51 p.m. March 26 to reflect Corredera’s statement.