Fraternity ban lifted for all but two chapters

First-year+Connor+Gage+died+Feb.+2+after+leaving+an+off-campus+fraternity.+The+investigation+into+his+death+prompted+the+activities+ban.
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Fraternity ban lifted for all but two chapters

First-year Connor Gage died Feb. 2 after leaving an off-campus fraternity. The investigation into his death prompted the activities ban.

First-year Connor Gage died Feb. 2 after leaving an off-campus fraternity. The investigation into his death prompted the activities ban.

First-year Connor Gage died Feb. 2 after leaving an off-campus fraternity. The investigation into his death prompted the activities ban.

First-year Connor Gage died Feb. 2 after leaving an off-campus fraternity. The investigation into his death prompted the activities ban.

Lee Hughes, Assistant News Editor

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While two fraternities remain under investigation, the fraternity activities ban may end for all but two chapters.

The ban, which was instated Feb. 5 following the Feb. 2 death of first-year Connor Gage, can be lifted for most fraternities if they complete an action plans released by Student Life Director Daphne Wells, March 29.

Initial autopsy reports indicated alcohol consumption and freezing temperatures lead to Gage’s death. The Burlington Police concluded that he attended two fraternity events the night of his death. The potential fraternity involvement prompted the University to pause all fraternity activity, Vice Provost Annie Stevens said in a Feb. 7 Cynic article.

All fraternities except for Delta Tau Delta and Alpha Epsilon Pi are eligible to follow the steps of the plan to lift the suspension on their activities, communications director Enrique Corredera said.

The investigation, in accordance with UVM’s Student Organization Misconduct Investigation and Resolution Procedures, is continuing through an independent investigator, Wells stated. The charge being investigated is “enabling consumption of alcohol by minor students,” she stated.

AEPi was not a recognized fraternity before the instatement of the ban. The fraternity had received a five year ban in 2014 for alcohol and hazing violations, according to a 2014 Burlington Free Press article.

UVM had identified which chapters were not involve, which allowed them to begin the process of lifting the ban, Wells stated in her letter to fraternities.

In order to get the ban lifted, eligible chapters must meet a number of requirements, including meeting with Fraternity and Sorority Life, submitting a recruitment plan and submitting a new member education plan, according to the individual chapter action plan sent out by Wells.

 

This story was updated 9:52 a.m. March 30 to update Corredera’s statement.