UPDATE: UVM to shut down campus at 1:30 due to hazardous conditions

Pictured+here+is+the+snow+sleet+risk+for+Vermont+from+the+National+Weather+Service+from+Feb.+7+through+Feb.+8.+
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UPDATE: UVM to shut down campus at 1:30 due to hazardous conditions

Pictured here is the snow sleet risk for Vermont from the National Weather Service from Feb. 7 through Feb. 8.

Pictured here is the snow sleet risk for Vermont from the National Weather Service from Feb. 7 through Feb. 8.

National Weather Service

Pictured here is the snow sleet risk for Vermont from the National Weather Service from Feb. 7 through Feb. 8.

National Weather Service

National Weather Service

Pictured here is the snow sleet risk for Vermont from the National Weather Service from Feb. 7 through Feb. 8.

Sawyer Loftus, News and Sports Editor

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Update: UVM President Suresh Garimella has declared a “state of campus emergency” due to hazardous weather.

All classes starting at 1:10 p.m. and later are cancelled. All academic and administrative offices will close at 1:30 p.m.

Earlier story below:

UVM employees and faculty are still required to come into work Friday, despite a winter storm bearing down on Burlington.

All schools in Chittenden County, including the Burlington School District and Champlain College, are closed today.

In a Feb. 6 email sent to UVM deans, directors and other staff members, Gary Derr, Vice President of Operations and Public Safety, stated the University will remain open even with “difficult driving conditions.”

At 3:20 p.m. Feb. 6, the National Weather Service Burlington continued their winter storm warning into Friday night.

“The hazardous conditions will impact both the morning and evening commutes on Friday,” the National Weather Service’s alert stated.

Burlington is expected to receive between 10 to 20 inches of snow and accumulations of ice around 1/10 of an inch, according to the National Weather Service.

Derr stated in his email that all employees that call out will have to use available leave time, if their supervisor approves it.

“Employees are expected to work as scheduled and directed, unless their absence is authorized,” Derr’s email stated. “Supervisors and managers have the ability to deny any request that would interfere with the University’s business operations (e.g. snow removal, de-icing).”

Managers and supervisors can allow employees to leave early, arrive late or work from home if appropriate, according to Derr’s email.