The Vermont Cynic

UVM Senior dies unexpectedly

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UVM Senior dies unexpectedly

Courtesy Facebook

Courtesy Facebook

Courtesy Facebook

Sawyer Loftus, Assistant Breaking News Editor

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UVM Senior Nikisha Falcone has died unexpectedly.

Annie Stevens, vice provost for student affairs, announced Falcone’s death in an email to the UVM community Oct. 1. Falcone died Sept. 30, according to the email.

The University extends its deepest condolences to Falcone’s family and the greater UVM community, the email stated.

Falcone was majoring in Psychology with a minor in Linguistics, according to the email. During her time at UVM Falcone was a resident advisor, a lead resident advisor, an orientation leader and community advisor in the Redstone Lofts, according to the email.

Students are encouraged to reach out to CAPS if they are in needed of additional support during this difficult time, the email stated.

 

5 Comments

5 Responses to “UVM Senior dies unexpectedly”

  1. John Doe on October 1st, 2018 8:53 pm
  2. Anonymous on October 2nd, 2018 2:01 pm

    The university respects the wishes of the family, and you can’t possibly know what the circumstances are unless you’ve been told otherwise. In many religions, you cannot be buried in a church graveyard if suicide was the cause of death. Even if that were the case, the family and loved ones deserve privacy to grieve however they choose. It’s not anyone’s right to know any details. Please respect that.

  3. Anonymous 2 on October 2nd, 2018 4:06 pm

    Well said. Thank you.

  4. Seth on December 9th, 2018 11:15 pm

    I actually agree with the first commenter. We need to be able to talk about suicide and stop hiding it, and further stigmatize mental illness as something shameful.

    Furthermore, the family has a right to privacy, but they do not own this person. Her death and the factors around it are a matter of public record, and should be. I’m a huge proponent of privacy, but I think it’s far too much to say that we should make ourselves woefully ignorant of a tragedy just to make someone feel better, someone who, as previously expressed, no one even knows what their wishes are.

    That being said, I don’t think it’s a huge deal if The Cynic doesn’t say what happened, because, after all, Google exists. But it is indeed a disturbing notion, this censoring of important information.

  5. Seth Wade on December 28th, 2018 5:38 pm

    I’m sympathetic to both viewpoints. Grisly details should not be waved around—that’s too far. However, I think the right of the public to know the barest minimum (cause of death) trumps the anyone’s feelings. And I’m a huge privacy advocate, so it’s shocking for me to say that. But I also understand that, after all, if someone really wants to know, they can just google it, or access public records at city hall. Still, it’s a dangerous precedent to deny ourselves this knowledge, to not even be able to say the cause of death out of fear masquerading as sympathy. I think we need to look at the effects of our actions, not our intentions.

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UVM Senior dies unexpectedly